posted by | on radio, self-help

AJGpr client, Boni Lonnsburry, CEO of Inner Art Inc., an expert in “conscious creation,” and author of the award-winning book The Map To Our Responsive Universe — Where Dreams Really Do Come True! recently shared her “blueprint” for a life of sustained happiness with host Nick Lawrence on Straight Talk (WEEU Radio).

Lawrence asks Boni to share her “rags to riches” personal life journey with listeners and her step-by-step guide to living a completely satisfying life outlined in her book The Map. Listen and you will learn strategies to change your “unconscious creation”, which we all do, into “conscious creation” or buy The Map today and start your journey to fulfillment and happiness in life.

posted by | on health, radio

What to Do When You Can’t Get Pregnant: The Complete Guide to All the TechnologiesFor Couples Facing Fertility Problem

By Daniel A. Potter, MD, FACOG and Jennifer S. Hanin, MA

What to Do When You Can’t Get Pregnant was lauded by Newsweek for guiding readers through the “medical maze” of infertility treatments she it was first released 5 years ago. Now in its second edition (available for pre-order on Amazon and due in bookstores on November 26th), co-authors and AJGpr clients world-renowned fertility expert Daniel A. Potter, MD, FACOG named one of the top reproductive endocrinologists by U. S. World News & World Report and Jennifer S. Hanin, MA, award-winning author, bring the book up-to-date.

Potter and Hanin include significant updates to up your game when trying to get pregnant — up-to-date statistics, proven tips to maximize your fertility, the latest medications, genetic testing like PGS and PDG that give you a head start, revolutionary new procedures for handling your frozen brood (eggs and embryo), hormone replacement, gender selection, and even revolutionary new supplements for infertile men.

To help promote the release of the second edition of What to Do When You Can’t Get PregnantAJGpr has booked Potter and Hanin on several radio shows.  Listen to Jennifer Hanin on  Talk of the Town with Host Dan Collier Boston, MA/Providence, RI (WDIS) and  LIVE on the Steve Hexom Show (KBUR).

 

posted by | on celebrity, fitness

Miley Cyrus — “I gave her those legs” says Mari Winsor

Yesterday, PeopleStyleWatch.com, published a story on Miley Cyrus’s style choices and interviewed AJGpr client, the Queeen of Pilates, Mari Winsor about her contributions to Miley’s fab abs and long, lean leg as her personal Pilates trainer.

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Miley Cyrus’s Pilates Instructor, On How to Get the Star’s Crop Top-Ready Abs and Super-Lean Legs

Regardless of our thoughts on Miley Cyrus‘s sartorial choices these days there’s no denying that she’s gotten herself into amazing shape in order to wear the, shall we say, often skimpy getups she now favors.

So while we’re not sure we ourselves would wear a pink satin bra and mini with creepers to our own album release party (and this is the tamer of the two outfits she wore) we are interested in how one would shape up to look that good in that outfit.

Enter Mari Winsor, an L.A.-based Pilates instructor whose studio Cyrus has been spotted leaving many times this year. “I gave her those legs,” Mari tells PEOPLE of Cyrus’s now oft-exposed stems. “She’s always going to have those long gorgeous legs. We just toned and firmed in all the right places.”

After Cyrus got sick of the paparazzi following her to her daily workouts, she installed a studio in her own home, where Winsor pays house calls when Cyrus’s busy schedule permits. “She wants to be healthy, she wants to have good abs,” Winsor says. “It always makes her feel better and clearer when she works out.”

So what’s on Cyrus’s Pilates routine that keeps her in such amazing shape? “When we work out we don’t just do a couple of moves,” Winsor says, adding they do the sidekick series and Cadillacs for legs and butt, then plenty of ab work to ensure Cyrus can get into a crop top on a moment’s notice. “It’s at least a half an hour of working out … You have to learn how to not just tighten up your tummy but actually pull your tummy in to your lower back as much as you can,” she says. “Just doing 40 crunches a day isn’t gonna do it for you.”

Want to see Cyrus’s favorite moves in action (and work towards your own set of leg-baring granny panties)? Winsor’s latest DVD is Pink Ribbon Pilates, which donates a percentage of proceeds to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. And though twerking is not on the DVD, Winsor says she fully supports that portion of Cyrus’s workout routine as well. “Doesn’t every woman like to shake their booty a little bit? C’mon!” she says. “It feels good to shake that s–t loose a little bit.”

Sign up for Mari Winsor’s newsletter at the bottom of her winsorfit home page here.

posted by | on fitness

On Thursday, September 5, 2013, Well & Good NYC, published an interview with AJGpr client, Mari Winsor — lovingly known as the Queen of Pilates entitled Mari Winsor: How Pilates Keeps Her Young at 63.

Mari currently owns two studios in Southern California — West Hollywood and Santa Monica where clients work with top trainers privately, semi-privately and in group mat classes.

Below is the Well & Good NYC interview with journalist Lisa Elaine Held.

Mari Winsor: How Pilates Keeps Her Young at 63


Famed Los Angeles instructor Mari Winsor is part of the Pilates vanguard. And at 63, she continues to expand her fitness empire, with celebrity clients (like Miley Cyrus—Winsor’s responsible for her abs, but not for that dance), and a new DVD out this week.

The DVD, Pink Ribbon Pilates, includes five 20-minute Pilates workouts, one of which is specifically designed to help breast cancer survivors during recovery from surgery and illness. (A percentage of each purchase goes to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation.)

“There are a lot of workouts that don’t focus on what somebody can do when they’re not quite 100 percent,” Winsor says. “They want to do something for their bodies, but they don’t know what to do.”

That’s true even for healthy people—particularly as they get older. We asked Winsor to dish on how she stays fit, healthy, and happy as she ages—and for her advice on how those who haven’t (yet) dedicated their lives to fitness can follow her.

How long have you been doing Pilates? I feel like my whole life. I was a dancer for 20 years, and I had a nice dance career. I danced with Michael Jackson and did some movies. As time wore on, you go, “Well, hmm, I’m not going to be able to do this forever.” That’s when my friend who was the lead dancer for the Ailey company suggested I try Pilates. I found a place, and then along came Romana Kryzanowska (Joseph Pilates’ protege). I went and had one lesson with her when she visited LA, and I was like “Okay, this is it. This is what I need to learn.” I glued myself to her side.

At 63, you look incredible. I’m sure people must tell you that all of the time. Is it the Pilates? What’s your daily fitness routine like? I practice Pilates six days a week, and I also walk, and I do ballet class a couple times a week. For me, Pilates works from the inside out. You’re building flexibility and strength at the same time and strengthening your core, which is essential to holding on to good posture as you get older. But no matter what kind of workout you do, as long as you’re happy with it, you’re going to look and feel younger if you keep doing it. If you enjoy what you’re doing, no matter how many wrinkles you have, that youthful energy shines through.

That’s great advice. What about for people who are finding it challenging to work out as they age? Do you have tips for them? It’s a day-to-day challenge; it’s not easy. Sometimes you kind of have to force yourself to move around a little bit, even if it’s just talking a walk, doing some deep breathing. You want 20 minutes of constant motion. They say aerobically you need to have 20 minutes of constant movement to get benefits. With Pilates, you are in constant motion from the beginning to the end if you do it properly.

Is there anything else that’s not related to fitness that you think helps you feel and look great as you age? I think that beauty comes from within. If you’re at peace with yourself, and you’re a happy person, and you’re kind and have ethics, that shows. That glows through.

For more information, visit www.winsorfit.com or check out Pink Ribbon Pilates.

posted by | on health, parenting, radio

Host Gil Gross,  an award winning radio journalist who has reported the news to millions of Americans and interviewed pop culture icons and heads-of-state alike turned to AJGpr client Dr. Nina Shapiro after reading her Op-Ed in the Los Angeles Times — With fewer vaccinations, is your child’s school safe? Too many parents are seeking excemptions from California’s vaccination law. 

This story has legs…

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

posted by | on health, parenting

Data shows the anti-vaccination movement spreading to places like Malibu and Boulder — so Salon’s political reporter, Alex Seitz-Wald sought out AJGpr client, Dr. Nina Shapiro for some answers. Here is his article that appeared in Salon.com on Wednesday, August 13. 2013.

You may not immediately peg the woman in yoga pants sipping Kombucha outside Whole Foods as a science-denier, but she might be. The anti-vaccination movement, which posits — in the face of overwhelming empirical research — that vaccines cause autism and other diseases, seems to be picking up steam in many of the country’s wealthier, educated enclaves where parents are interested in living “natural” lifestyles.

“It’s a little bit cool, it’s a little bit of a trend,” says Nina Shapiro, a professor at UCLA medical school and mother of two who wrote an Op-Ed in the Los Angeles Times this weekend about her growing concern with the anti-vax movement.

It’s certainly true of the anti-vaccination’s most prominent voices, like actress Jenny McCarthy, who was just hired to a spot on “The View,” and environmentalist Robert Kennedy Jr.

“It’s that whole natural, BPA-free, hybrid car community that says ‘we’re not going to put chemicals in our children,’” Shapiro told Salon. “It’s that same idea: ‘I’m going to be pure and I want to keep my child pure.’”

California law mandates that all students get vaccinated, but it also makes it easy to get exemptions for personal beliefs. And parents in tony places like Marin County are taking advantage of it in seemingly growing numbers. One public elementary school in Malibu, an affluent beach town just north of Los Angeles, reported that only 58 percent of their students are immunized — well below the recommended 90-plus percent level — according to Shapiro.

And it’s even worse in some of L.A.’s private schools, where as few as 20 percent of kids are vaccinated in some schools. “Yes, that’s right: Parents are willingly paying up to $25,000 a year to schools at which fewer than 1 in 5 kindergartners has been immunized against the pathogens causing such life-threatening illnesses as measles, polio, meningitis and pertussis (more commonly known as whooping cough),” she wrote.

Shapiro’s Op-Ed provoked such heated discussion among the Times’ readers that the Southern California paper devoted a second item just to the reaction.

Joel Stein wrote in Time magazine a few years ago about his disagreement with his wife over vaccinating their children — he wanted to, she didn’t. Her view was “not unique,” he wrote, “at least not in the liberal, wealthy part of L.A. where we live.”

But it’s not just California. Public health officials see large clusters of unvaccinated children in latte-drinking enclaves everywhere, like Ashland, Ore., and Boulder, Colo., where close to 30 percent of children are exempted from one vaccine or another. In some schools in Ashland two-thirds of the students have exemptions, according to Mark Largent, a James Madison College professor who wrote a book about the vaccine debate last year.

And new data out this month from the Centers for Disease Control shows what Paul Offit, a pediatrician at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, calls a disturbing uptick in the number of children forgoing vaccinations. “For the first time ever, there are a handful of states which now have people who are choosing not to get vaccines at the greater than 5 percent level, which is a problem. That’s where you’re going to start to see some of these diseases coming back. And you’re already seeing it with whooping cough and other diseases,” he told Salon. Indeed, the anti-vaccination movement was blamed for helping cause the worst whooping cough epidemic in 70 years.

The states above 5 percent include Michigan, Vermont, Idaho and Oregon. Illinois barely missed the cut at 4.8 percent. The national median is 1.8 percent, with many states below 1 percent, making Vermont (5.7 percent) and Oregon (6.4 percent) more than three times above the national average.

Offit, a prominent skeptic of alternative medicine and pro-vaccination author, explained that high education levels can enhance, rather than deter, anti-vax beliefs. “They’re people who believe that they can know anything and know as much as their doctor — if not more — by simply studying it, reading about it,” he said. Many of these people, he added, are used to being in control of their lives and at their jobs and want to control this aspect of their lives as well.

Science writer Chris Mooney has written that vaccine denialism “largely occupies the political left,” though he later walked that back in light of polling data and pushback from Kevin Drum, David Frum, Andrew Sullivan and others, who pointed out that shopping at Whole Foods does not necessarily make you a liberal. And in Congress, the anti-vax movement is represented by Republicans.

And there’s some evidence to suggest that vaccine denialism is gaining strength on the far-out libertarian fringe of the right, where people like Michele Bachmann, Alex Jones and others have spoken out against what they see as a totalitarian mandate from the government to inoculate your children. That might help explain the presence of Idaho on the CDC list, and the fact that the data show the largest increases in non-medical exemptions came from Georgia and West Virginia.

posted by | on health, psychology, web

Money can’t buy you love, but a new study suggests lovemaking can earn you money – and not just if you’re employed in the red light district.

MarketWatch reporter Quentin Fottrell and AJGpr client, couples psychotherapist Dr. Fran Walfish join anchor WSJ News Editor, Wendy Bounds on the Wall Street Journal Digital Network live lifestyle show “Lunch Break” to discuss his story about new research on the relationship between sex and money.

Dr. Fran Walfish is the author of  The Self-Aware Parent (Palgrave Macmillan).

 

 

posted by | on parenting, print media

On August 10, 2013, the Los Angles Times featured an Op-Ed piece by AJGpr client Dr. Nina Shapiro, a professor in the Department of Head and Neck Surgery and director of pediatricotolaryngology at UCLA‘s Geffen School of Medicine. Dr. Shapiro is also the author of Take a Deep Breath: Clear the Air for the Health of Your Child.

With fewer vaccinations, is your child’s school safe?Too many parents are seeking exemption from California’s vaccination law.

Across the country, preschools and elementary schools are declaring themselves nut free or peanut free, asking families not to pack lunch foods that could pose life-threatening dangers to highly allergic children. And the prohibitions are expanding beyond nuts. Some schools, for example, have prohibited powdered cheese products to protect children who are especially dairy sensitive.

These measures may be excessive, but as a physician, I understand the desire to protect students. Children with serious allergies really can have severe reactions to trigger foods, so it’s not that surprising that some schools have reacted aggressively.

But the great bulk of children face a far greater risk of harm from disease. If the goal is really to protect children, I’d like to see all schools declared “unvaccinated-free zones.”

The law in California mandates that students in public and private schools be immunized, but it also allows easy-to-get exemptions for personal beliefs.

Although some 90% of the state’s kindergartners are up to date on their immunizations, it is not uncommon for individual public elementary schools to report that more than one-third of their kindergartners are not.

And if you’re thinking this must be a problem unique to schools in low-income neighborhoods, think again. One of Malibu’s three elementary schools reported that just 58% of its kindergartners were up to date on their vaccinations, and some other affluent areas throughout the state have schools with similar compliance rates.

Private schools vary widely, but some have rates of less than 20%. Yes, that’s right: Parents are willingly paying up to $25,000 a year to schools at which fewer than 1 in 5 kindergartners has been immunized against the pathogens causing such life-threatening illnesses as measlespolio,meningitis and pertussis (more commonly known as whooping cough). In order for a school to be considered truly immunized, from a public health standpoint, its immunization rate needs to be 90% or higher.

Parents have varied reasons for choosing not to immunize their children. Some are concerned that vaccinations raise the risk of autism, although study after study has debunked this myth. Others, concerned that small bodies can’t tolerate so many vaccines at once, have decided to spread out the schedule recommended by the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, though there is little evidence to support this practice. Some parents think that because some of the illnesses for which kids get immunized are extremely rare these days, there’s little reason to vaccinate.

But here’s the reality: These diseases do exist, and we’re already seeing some of them make a comeback.

When I was in medical school, pertussis was discussed primarily in the past tense. We learned about how whooping cough had taken the lives of many people in the 1930s, before a vaccine was available. It felt like ancient history. But now, pertussis has made a comeback in California and other states, causing severe illness in kids and adults. Children have died.

There is also a vaccine now to protect against Haemophilus influenzae type b, a bacterial disease that can cause severe respiratory illnesses, meningitis, eye infections, blocked breathing and even death. In the years after the vaccine was licensed in 1985, the disease was nearly eradicated, but now it’s back too.

Dr. Jonas Salk, creator of the polio vaccine, spoke at my medical school graduation. Polio killed millions and paralyzed millions more, but thanks to Salk and Albert Sabin, whose vaccine came soon after Salk’s, we haven’t seen outbreaks in the U.S. since the 1950s.

It used to seem a sure bet that polio was gone for good in the United States and would soon be eradicated everywhere. In 2012, just 223 cases of polio were reported worldwide, all but six of them in the three countries where the disease remains endemic: Afghanistan, Pakistan and Nigeria. One barrier to complete eradication has been suspicion toward the vaccine in remote areas of those countries. It’s ironic that vaccine suspicion is now growing here as well.

It still seems likely we’ll win the war against polio. But it’s no longer looking all that certain with whooping cough, meningitis and measles, to name a few. They could be coming soon to a school near you.

Check vaccination rates at your child’s school.

posted by | on entertainment, parenting, tv

Sasha Emmons of Parenting.com examines the question of media violence and it’s effect of kids today.

She opens her article stating, “With every school shooting, like December’s horrific massacre in Newtown, questions about guns in media and their connection to real-life violence bubble to the surface again. After all, there have been reports that Sandy Hook shooter Adam Lanza was a fan of the ultra-bloody Call of Duty video game series.”

To read the full story click here.

For expert insight into this question, Sasha turned to my client, Dr. Gwenn O’Keeffe, pediatrician, parenting and digital media expert, and CEO of Pediatrics Now. Dr. Gwenn is the author of  Cybersafe: Protecting and empowering Kids in the Digital World of Texting, Gaming, and Social Media.

 

 

 

 

posted by | on entertainment, web

Greg Milam of Sky.com, recently interviewed AJGpr client, talent manager Susie Mains and author of the upcoming book Baby You’re A Star about Lindsay Lohan and her most recent brush with the law. Below is the transcript. Click on the link to view the video

LINDSAY LOHAN ON TRIAL OVER LYING TO COPS

By Greg Milam, US Correspondent

Troubled star Lindsay Lohan goes on trial in a case that represents her most serious brush with the law in six years of scandal.

The 26-year-old is accused of lying to police when she told them she was not behind the wheel of a Porsche that collided with a truck as she headed to filming of the movie Liz & Dick in June.

If she is found guilty, Lohan could also be in breach of her probation for a conviction for shoplifting from a jeweller’s shop in the Californian beach resort of Venice.

The former child star has repeatedly been in trouble with the law since she was arrested for driving under the influence in 2007.

A catalogue of arrests, court appearances and rehab has become fodder for America’s huge entertainment news industry.

Mike Walters, news director of TMZ.com, told Sky News that this is the most serious case she has ever faced.

“She is not going to get a slap on the wrist and sent to jail for a couple of days. She is going to be there for a long time,” he said.

He accepts the media has played a part in her troubles – but that can be no excuse for her.

“When Lindsay Lohan first got in trouble I would say the way it was covered could have caused some of her problems,” he said.

“But at a point you’ve got to say ‘Take some responsibility’. She is an adult, she has been famous for a number of years, you can’t blame the media, her parents, her upbringing, the movies she was on, her ex-boyfriends, after all this time.”

Her life has become a cautionary tale for those who spot child stars and guide them through the minefield of Hollywood and fame.

Susie Mains, a child talent agent and author of Baby, You’re A Star, told Sky News: “Lindsay Lohan was wanted by producers and directors, and now she’s wanted by the law.

“The greatest tragedy is that she is so uber-talented, unbelievably, off-the-charts talented, and made the difficult transition from child star to meaningful movie star, but couldn’t sustain it.”

Lohan faces misdemeanour charges of reckless driving, giving false information to a police officer and resisting, obstructing or delaying an officer in relation to the crash in Santa Monica. Each carries a potential jail sentence of three months to a year.

It has been reported she rejected the offer of a plea deal offered by prosecutors which had proposed she spent 90 days in a locked rehabilitation facility.

Her lawyer, Mark Heller, told the last court hearing that Lohan was currently in therapy.

He said: “This is not what she needs – rehab. Lindsay doesn’t have a problem with alcohol and drugs. Lindsay’s issues are different.”

Judge James Dabney dismissed his calls for a delay, saying: “I don’t know how the next two weeks is suddenly going to change the history of these cases.